Lackawanna Magazine -April 1954

Bustling Buffalo Is
BIG BUSINESS FOR LACKAWANNA

LOCATED in the heart of the world- famous Niagara region and at the gateway to Canada is Buffalo, New York. The city sits athwart one of the busiest crossroads of American commerce. As an industrial center, Buffalo is ninth in size in the United States and at the same time it is the second largest city in the state of New York.

The superlatives concerning Buf- falo could go on and on, but it is important to note that the city is re- garded as the second largest railroad center in the United States and the largest inland water port in value of water-borne commerce handled. The city has the distinction of be- ing the first city in the world in flour and feed milling and the center of one of the largest electro-chemical and electro-metallurgical production areas in the world. As a consequence of Buffalo's po- sition, it is one of the Lackawanna's most important freight and passenger points. Freight solicitation offices of the railroad are located in the pas- senger station. In charge of freight solicitation is E. C. Ennis, general freight agent, whose staff includes A. J. Kemnitzer, E. J. Sanborn and P. L. Bolger, traffic representatives; John O'Hearn, chief clerk; A. W. Wild, assistant chief clerk, Charles Crowe, statistician, and Helen Plarr, secretary.

Passenger offices are located at 11 W. Genesee Street, in downtown Bur- falo, where Neil A. Mitts, general agent, passenger department, has his office. He is assisted by C. A. O'Brien, Jr., city passenger agent; J. O. Storms, passenger agent, and R. C. Grabenstatter, chief clerk. The operations of both the passen- ger and freight departments at Buf- falo are not consigned strictly to the city and its immediate vicinity. The territory of the freight depart- ment, for instance, includes an area that extends east as far as Rochester and Painted Post, N. Y., south to a line that runs between Clearfield and Greenville, Pennsylvania, thence northward along the Pennsylvania state line to Lake Erie. The territory includes a small section west of Niagara Falls and north of Lake Erie on a line between Pt. Colborne, Wel- land and St. Catherine to Lake On- tario. The mainline of the Lacka- wanna runs through the upper third of the territory.

This territory is a rich producer of many of the things that are basic to America and at the same time for export.

Buffalo itself bustles with activity with its towering grain elevators; flour and feed manufacturing; big steel works and rolling mills; air- plane manufacturing; food products; paper and paper products; stone, clay and glass products; automobile assembly, and scores of other diver- sified industrial and commercial ac- tivities.

The touchstone to Buffalo's growth and position industrially and com- mercially is economical distribution by rail. The Lackawanna's big East Buffalo yard and the railway's fast, de- pendable freight service in and out of the city has not been without its importance to this bustling territory. The city has 12 railroad freight terminals, at which approximately 45,000 trains enter annually. There are five passenger terminals with more than 50,000 trains scheduled annually. Combined, the terminals have some 600 miles of trackage with a car capacity of approximately 57,000.

Approximately 60,000,000 bushels of wheat are milled every year in the city, with 70 per cent of it becoming flour and the remainder going into poultry and dairy feeds. In addition to these things com- mercial and industrial, Buffalo fairly teems with interesting things to see and entertaining things to do. As proof of this more than two million people visit the city every year . . . many of them via The Route of Phoebe Snow.

Transcribed from the April 1954 issue of "Lackawanna Magazine" by J. Henry Priebe

This text is Copyright 2001 all rights reserved by Stephen Powell and buffalonian.com. This electronic text may not be dupicated or used in any manner without written consent of Stephen R. Powell or buffalonian.com

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Passenger offices are located at 11 W. Genesee Street, in downtown Bur- falo, where Neil A. Mitts, general agent, passenger department, has his office. He is assisted by C. A. O'Brien, Jr., city passenger agent; J. O. Storms, passenger agent, and R. C. Grabenstatter, chief clerk. The operations of both the passen- ger and freight departments at Buf- falo are not consigned strictly to the city and its immediate vicinity. The territory of the freight depart- ment, for instance, includes an area that extends east as far as Rochester and Painted Post, N. Y., south to a line that runs between Clearfield and Greenville, Pennsylvania, thence northward along the Pennsylvania state line to Lake Erie. The territory includes a small section west of Niagara Falls and north of Lake Erie on a line between Pt. Colborne, Wel- land and St. Catherine to Lake On- tario. The mainline of the Lacka- wanna runs through the upper third of the territory.

This territory is a rich producer of many of the things that are basic to America and at the same time for export.

Buffalo itself bustles with activity with its towering grain elevators; flour and feed manufacturing; big steel works and rolling mills; air- plane manufacturing; food products; paper and paper products; stone, clay and glass products; automobile assembly, and scores of other diver- sified industrial and commercial ac- tivities.

The touchstone to Buffalo's growth and position industrially and com- mercially is economical distribution by rail. The Lackawanna's big East Buffalo yard and the railway's fast, de- pendable freight service in and out of the city has not been without its importance to this bustling territory. The city has 12 railroad freight terminals, at which approximately 45,000 trains enter annually. There are five passenger terminals with more than 50,000 trains scheduled annually. Combined, the terminals have some 600 miles of trackage with a car capacity of approximately 57,000.

Approximately 60,000,000 bushels of wheat are milled every year in the city, with 70 per cent of it becoming flour and the remainder going into poultry and dairy feeds. In addition to these things com- mercial and industrial, Buffalo fairly teems with interesting things to see and entertaining things to do. As proof of this more than two million people visit the city every year . . . many of them via The Route of Phoebe Snow.

For more on area railroads and much, much more goto: railfan.net

Transcribed from the April 1954 issue of "Lackawanna Magazine" by J. Henry Priebe -www.railfan.net

 

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